Javier Pena Ibanez’s

Spanish designer Javier Pena Ibanez’s appropriately named plant-loving furniture collection, Basics. Using really simple materials—perforated pine board, rope, rope probes and test tubes–Ibanez builds minimalist pieces which assemble and disassemble easily while also multitasking for space-challenged footprints like mine. Basics are just the kind of simple chic that urban garden lovers love. 

 A development of pieces inspired by the simple concepts of assembly / disassembly and perforation of the elements as a resource for processing. 

URBAN ISLAND COLLABORATION WITH CEASORSTONES

designer Werner Aisslinger

Designer Werner Aisslinger unveiled a brilliant living chair at this year's Milan Design Week that is grown from the ground up instead of being produced in a factory. The green chair consists of a live plant that is growing in a specialized shape set by a steel mold. When the mold is removed, it leaves behind a naturally cultivated seat to perch upon.

Aisslinger‘s Chair Farm considers the way we consume furniture: instead of importing items for use, we can nurture and shape them ourselves and then harvest them locally instead of having them manufactured in a far-flung factory. The design minimizes resource use and waste, making it an exceptionally sustainable alternative to standard chairs.

Aisslinger has been experimenting with advanced sustainable technology for years. In many ways the Chair Farm represents a natural evolution of some of his previous pieces, like the “Hemp chair” he launched at last year’s Milan Furniture Fair


Read more: Chair Farm: Werner Aisslinger creates chairs from living trees! Werner Aisslinger's Chair Farm – Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

Vicky Pendant Lamp Terrarium Shines a Light on Indoor Gardening .

Mexican-born, Netherlands-based designer José de la O unveiled a brilliant hanging pendant lamp that doubles as a vegetable garden at this year’s Milan Furniture Fair. Dubbed “Vicky”, the lamp uses a special bulb that provides increased light in the blue spectrum, which helps the plants grow. The designer sees the lamp not only as a source of light but also as a resource for growing food in urban environments that lack space for a garden.

Read more: Vicky Pendant Lamp Terrarium Shines a Light on Indoor Gardening | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

TERRARIUMS ARE A KIND OF PRODUCT DESIGN WHERE INNOVATION IS TAKING PLACE ONE THE PER EXISTING FORM. RATHER THAN BUILDING A NEW FORM ALL THE ENERGY IS SPENT ON CREATING THE TECHNOLOGY TO MAKE THE IDEA WORK. I WOULD ASLO LEARN FROM IT THAT IT IS NOT HOW ONE STARTS FROM THE SCRATCH BUT HOW ONE HAS THE CAPABILITY TO BRING THE DESIGN INNOVATION IN THE PRODUCTS THAT ARE ALREADY THEIR.

Biophotovoltaic Moss Table Generates Electricity Through Photosynthesis

SWISS DESIGNER--Theresa Harmanen

Moss Table is an innovative furnishing that demonstrates the future potential of Bio-Photo-Voltaic (BPV) technology. Here electricity is generated from the electrons captured by conductive fibers inside the moss table. The technology turns energy that would otherwise be wasted in the photosynthesis process into power that can be put to practical use.

 

The ‘moss pots‘ in the table act as bio-electrochemical devices converting the chemical energy into electrical energy using biological material such as algea, cyanobacteria, and vascular plants. The ‘Moss Table’ is still in its concept stage, but it can already produce enough electricity t0 power smaller devices such as digital clocks. Scientists are predicting that future BPV devices will be able to power larger devices such as lamps and even laptops.

‘Moss Table’ is being used to spread BPV research to a wider audience, and is part of a larger research project called ‘Design in Science’ exploring ways for design and science to meet.

 



Read more: Biophotovoltaic Moss Table Generates Electricity Through Photosynthesis Biophotovoltaics Moss Planter Table – Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

Hanging Plant Sphere

designer José de la O

"A clear borosilicate glass sphere to hang plants and flowers. The frosted bottom helps the plant to protect it's roots for direct light making the plant to last longer. This object is entirely made by hand at a family owned glass workshop in Mexico City.

Size: 16 x 10 x 10 cm + length of rope."

TO ME THE GLASS PEICE GIVES A BOTANICAL FEEL THE THE HANGING POT ALSO GIVING THE TENDER AND THE FRAGILE FEEL ADDING ON TO THE PROPERTIES OF THE LIVING ORGANISM.I LIKE HOW ITS SUSPENDED WITH THE HELP OF ROPES. THRE IS SOMETHING IN THE SIMPLICITY THAT HAS ATTRACTED ME TOWARDS THE OBJECT.

The making

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